Tag Archives: art

Transparency, turbulence, ambiguity and uncertainty in #activelearning

“One student’s safe uncertainty is another student’s chaotic nightmare.” (Orr & Shreeve, 2018) Based on research I conducted with others into student satisfaction of learning (Heaton et al., 2015), being clear with students about what is expected of them has … Continue reading

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Mapping my learning: visualising not just being visual

A few posts ago I thought through some ideas about using metaphorical maps as a way of navigating learning. I want to pursue this here to discover further intersections and connections, especially as we gear up for the collaborative inquiry … Continue reading

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Teaching as craft, learning as art?

I have been reading a stimulating paper by Mandy Lupton from 2013 on reclaiming the art of teaching, which you can find here. Her concern is for the art of teaching, and how it is lost to “a higher education … Continue reading

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The writing is on the wall – poetry and place

There has been an interesting little discussion on Twitter today following a post from @viviennestern. This, on a wall @sheffhallamuni made me stop and stare. For all the vitriol about universities, they exist to help us think better, understand more. What … Continue reading

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Learning from the Futurists: analysis of the third Futurist manifesto

The route of the manifesto as an art form is Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’ The Communist Manifesto (1848). Loud, clear and confrontational, this form was later adopted by F.T.Marinetti in The Foundation and Manifesto of Futurism (1909), and from … Continue reading

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